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NC Department of Health and Human Services Division of Services for the Blind
 
 

Commission for the Blind Meeting Minutes

September 13, 2003

Call to Order, Invocation and Pledge of Allegiance

Chairman John Miller called the meeting of the Commission for the Blind to order at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, September 13, 2003. A roll call was conducted and the following members were present: Allen Moore, Mary Le O’Daniel, Annette Clinard, Anita Wayne, Catherleen Thomas, Ron Huber, Tom Winton, and Norma Krajczar.

Members not present: George Murphy with an excused absence; Terry Wethington with an unexcused absence.

Others present: Debbie Jackson, Emily DuBois, Sandy Foster (ex-officio), Sally Syria, Sheryl Dotson, JoAnn Strader, Diane Whitley, Jan Fesperman, and David Arthur.

Allen Moore offered the invocation.

Appointment of Parliamentarian and Remarks by Chair

Tom Winton was appointed Parliamentarian.

Approval of Minutes

A motion was made by Norma Krajczar, seconded by Mary Le O’Daniel, and carried to approve the minutes of the June 14, 2003 meeting.

Committee Reports

Public Relations – Ron Huber

Mr. Huber asked for information from DSB to include in the Lions District newsletters. The newsletter is published the 1st of each month.

Kathy Brack and Dr. Joseph Wiggins arrived at the meeting.

Inter-Committee Relations – Allen Moore

  • A SILC meeting was held yesterday. The SILC has two new members, Freida Lee and Scott Broadway.
  • John Dalrymple represented George McCoy. The State VR office is being reorganized.
  • Mr. Moore indicated that he was re-appointed to the SILC.
  • A report was given on Part B by Tim Barbour.
  • A freedom rally will take place in Raleigh on September 17. Topics of discussion are Olmstead, ADA, etc. This is in conjunction with a group that will march from Philadelphia to Washington, DC. For more information, go to web site www.nc-ddc.org .
  • SILC quarterly meetings will now take place in February, May, August, and November.

Advocacy – John Miller

Mr. Miller stated at the moment there is nothing requiring advocacy.

He stated that Left Turn on Red is at rest for the time being.

Director’s Report – Debbie Jackson for John DeLuca

Retreat

On the morning of August 1, 2003, members of the management teams from DSB, the Division of Services for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing and the Office of Education Services met with Secretary Hooker Odom, Deputy Secretary Lanier Cansler, and Assistant Secretary Lynda McDaniel in a mini-retreat setting to discuss programs, vision and goals for these programs for the next year and a half, and any obstacles that might prevent attainment of those goals. The session offered a unique opportunity to talk about hopes and concerns with the Secretary in a small group setting that was conducive to open discussion. As such, it was a valuable opportunity for all concerned. The fact that Secretary Hooker Odom is having such meetings with DHHS Divisions is very noteworthy and much appreciated.

Retirement

Lynda McDaniel, Assistant Secretary, will be retiring at the end of September. Ms. McDaniel will be replaced by Jackie Sheppard.

RSA Monitoring Visit

During the week of August 18, 2003, DSB hosted a monitoring visit by Mary Davis of the Atlanta office of RSA. These monitoring visits occur on an annual basis. Areas reviewed by Ms. Davis included transition services, standards and indicators, relationships between DSB and joblink centers, and the status of agreements between DSB and public institutions of higher learning in North Carolina. Although DSB does not expect to receive the written report of the visit until October or November, it is believed that the report will be a positive one.

NewsLine

At present, 37 states have NewsLine for the blind, a service through which eligible users can access many newspapers across the nation, including the Raleigh News & Observer and the Charlotte Observer, through the touch-tone telephone. North Carolina has had this service on a statewide basis for the last year and a half through a federal grant to the National Federation of the Blind. These grant funds are about to expire and advocates worked very hard this year to obtain legislative funding for the continuation of this service. Although that effort was unsuccessful, DHHS and DSB have identified sufficient resources to continue the service for a year while advocates seek legislative funding in 2004.

Recruitment

Two important initiatives are underway in DSB at the present time. These include the search for an additional Independent Living Rehabilitation Counselor, to be based in the Raleigh District Office, and replacement of a Low Vision Specialist, who left DSB to resume his education.

Relocation

The DSB Evaluation Unit has moved to the 1st floor of the Haywood Building. Four staff from the Cole Building have been moved to the 2nd floor of the Haywood Building to relieve some of the overcrowding in Cole.

Ticket to Work

DSB is gearing up to roll out the Ticket to Work effort. This is an effort by the SSA to assist people in becoming employed. Implementation will begin in November. North Carolina is in the 3rd phase of rollout.

Recent and Upcoming Events

Training will begin as early as the day after tomorrow for supervisors. During the weeks of June 16 and August 4, the Rehabilitation Center hosted seminars for independent living consumers. These seminars focused on additional instruction in such areas as assistive technology, orientation and mobility, and Braille. During the second and fourth weekends in September, Camp Dogwood will host persons who are deaf/blind. During October 13-15, the VIP Fishing Tournament will take place on the Outer Banks. Approximately 550 blind and visually impaired individuals are expected to attend. Plans are underway for the 2nd Annual Joint Outreach Conference that is tentatively scheduled for the March 11-13, 2004.

Ms. Krajczar asked about the status of the DSB newsletter. Ms. Jackson stated that it is in the works. The first edition will go out the end of September. (The first edition of the DSB newsletter is attached to these minutes).

Report of the Consumer and Advocacy Advisory Committee – Tim Jones

Mr. Winton stated that there was good attendance with several entities reporting.

Report of the Professional Advisory Committee – Dr. Joseph Wiggins

Dr. Wiggins stated DSB was able to get through last year even though there were cuts. No one was denied services. Funds were used from "other vending" to help fund this area.

Mr. Miller asked if the Professional Advisory Committee could assist the Lions with staffing the vision van. Dr. Wiggins stated he would follow up and take this into consideration.

Old Business

Mr. Winton gave an update on the VITP.

  • The VITP Advisory Board continues to meet on a bi-monthly basis. Tom Winton and Deborah Hatton are co-chairs. At the recent meeting an update was received from Dr. Ellen Bacon that Dr. Alana Zambone has been hired in the slot that was vacant. Dr. Zambone has assumed Directorship of the program. Dr. Zambone has an extensive background in VI, child development, and deaf/blindness.
  • The Board has written a letter of concern to Molly Broad, with copies to Chancellor Ammons, Provost Reuben, Dean Steppe-Jones, and Brad Wilson, about the continuing uncertainty regarding Dr. Brad Walker’s position. In the letter it was noted that the ongoing uncertainty regarding Dr. Walker’s tenure was creating stress for the program and urged that the matter be resolved as soon as possible. Subsequent to the last meeting, Dr. Walker’s contract was approved.

Wharton Trust Fund update:

Mr. Miller shared an issue that came up at the Governor Morehead Foundation (GMF) meeting pertaining to the Wharton Trust. The Wharton Trust was established in 1993 and is money that was given to GMF to be administered through the NC Commission for the Blind for post-secondary education for blind persons in the US. The bank that administered the trust worked with a former deputy director of DSB to channel payouts from the trust to the GMF who then received information from DSB about post-secondary costs covered by the Rehab Program. What had appealed to the bank was that those dollars from the trust could be used to match rehab dollars. The GMF got payouts from the trust and would obtain documentation from DSB about agency expenditures for the post secondary costs of DSB clients and would then periodically write checks to DSB covering those costs. The bank decided that the time had come to dissolve the trust based on the wishes of the trust’s creator regarding longevity of the trust. The bank gave the remainder of the dollars in the trust to GMF. Another significant development was the evolving makeup of the GMF Board from being predominantly DSB and GMS employees to having a majority of individuals not employed by the State. As the amount of money from the Wharton Trust dwindled, the GMF thought that it should not just exhaust this funding. DSB never stopped having the need that the money had been meeting. The will of the GMF changed to hang onto it rather than remit anymore of it to DSB. The last payment of it that DSB received was approximately three years ago.

There is presently a resolution to dissolve the trust and place the money in the general coffers of the GMF to fund special arts programs and other things that the GMF funds. A vote is being taken among the Foundation to do this. Mr. Miller stated that since the intent of this money was to be administered through the Commission for the Blind, he wanted to discuss this issue with the Commission members before he cast his vote. Mr. Miller feels that the Commission should have some say so as to whether there is agreement with the decision.

Since the last Commission meeting, Mr. Miller prepared a letter indicating concerns about the resolution and accuracy of the comments contained in the resolution. He indicated that he voted against the current resolution and could not agree with the assertion that all essential services are being provided or paid for and that there is no need by DSB consumers for the funding in question. Therefore, the resolution is on hold at the present time. Mr. Miller asked DSB staff to advise him of any current needs that DSB may have so that he can be prepared for discussion at the next GMF meeting which will take place in November.

New Business

Training of New Commission Members

In 1999, the State Rehabilitation Council was established. In states that the Governor has veto power, as in North Carolina, both the Commission for the Blind and the State Rehabilitation Council could be one and the same entity. In the past, the body of the Commission has always been a political body in the sense that it was always appointed by the Governor. That is the reason there are two different meetings. Thus, representation on the Commission consists of the following: (1) one representative of the Statewide Independent Living Council; (2) one representative of a parent training and information center established pursuant to section 631(c) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 20 U.S.C. 1431(c); (3) one representative of the State’s Client Assistance Program; (4) one vocational rehabilitation counselor who has knowledge of and experience in vocational rehabilitation services for the blind. A vocational rehabilitation counselor appointed pursuant to this subdivision shall serve as a nonvoting member of the Commission if the counselor is an employee of the Department of Health and Human Services; (5) one representative of community rehabilitation program services providers; (6) one current or former applicant for, or recipient of, vocational rehabilitation services; (7) one representative of a disability advocacy group representing individuals who are blind; (8) one parent, family member, guardian, advocate, or authorized representative of an individual who is blind, has multiple disabilities, and either has difficulty representing himself or herself or who is unable, due to disabilities, to represent himself or herself; (9) one representative of business, industry, and labor; (10) one representative of the directors of projects carried out under section 121 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. 741, as amended, if there are any of these projects in the State; (11) one representative of the Department of Public Instruction; (12) one representative of the Commission of Workforce Development; and (13) the Director of the Division of Services for the Blind shall serve as an ex-officio, nonvoting member. Ron Huber, Allen Moore, Catherleen Thomas, and Annette Clinard have recently been re-appointed. Mr. Miller stated that George Murphy has not been re-appointed. His commission ran out on 6-30-01. Ms. Krajczar stated that George Murphy’s position should be considered a vacant position.

Ms. O’Daniel shared that the Mecklenburg Chapter of the Federation is having a walk-a-thon in October. Anyone interested in sponsoring the walk-a-thon should see Mary Le O’Daniel.

Mr. Winton stated that the 2nd Annual Outreach Conference on the GMS campus is scheduled for March 11-13, 2004. It was decided by the conference committee that the future conference would be referred to as the North Carolina Conference on Visual Impairment and Blindness. It will continue to be sponsored by DSB, GMS, DPI, and AER, etc. Ms. Jackson suggested receiving the agenda as soon as it is available.

Mr. Miller entertained a motion that all materials from Commission meetings that are distributed to the Chairman be distributed to the Vice-Chairman as well. A motion was made by Mary Le O’Daniel, seconded by Norma Krajczar, and carried.

Mr. Miller addressed attendance. The Commission Bylaws state that two unexcused absences in a row is reason to be removed from and replaced on the Commission. This body cannot function properly unless every member is in attendance and involved. George Murphy has missed 5 out of the last 6 meetings. It is felt that the Commission needs to find an individual to replace Mr. Murphy. Terry Wethington has missed several meetings without calling. John Miller will make contact with Mr. Wethington to see what his status might be.

Kathy Brack introduced the question as to the possibility of the Commission/State Rehabilitation Council meeting on weekdays. After discussion, it was decided to leave the meetings on Saturday for the time being.

Adjournment of Commission Meeting

Following an adjournment motion, a second, and a vote, the meeting adjourned at 11:30 a.m. The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled for December 13, 2003.

Respectfully submitted,

John T. Miller, III, Chair
Commission for the Blind
Department of Health and Human Services

John B. DeLuca, Director
Division of Services for the Blind
Department of Health and Human Services


 NC DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

SEPTEMBER 13, 2003

FOURTH QUARTER (APR/MAY/JUN 2003)

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 2002/2003

ACTIVITIES OF THE

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND

This is an information report to the Commission for the Blind of the Department of Health & Human Services containing the activities of the Division of Services for the Blind during the fourth quarter,
Apr - June 2003, as well as the annual report for 2002/2003. Activities are reported in accessible format/text files on our web site for our users, www.ncdhhs.gov/dsb/. If accessibility problems are detected, please contact our web master at DSB.Webmaster@ncmail.net for assistance.


BUSINESS ENTERPRISES PROGRAM

FY 2003 BOARD REPORT

Fourth Quarter – April - June, 2003

Gross sales from all food service facilities amounted to $3,095,258 during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2003; for the same period last year gross sales were $3,176,063. The gross profit percentage for this quarter was 50.8% compared to 49.7% for the same period last year. Net proceeds totaled $775,754 during this period compared to $793,227 during the fourth quarter of SFY 02.

During this quarter renovations were completed at the Hal Marshall Center, Charlotte and the facilities located at Buncombe County Courthouse and Asheville City Hall. Additional vending machines were installed at the Federal Prison Camp, SJAFB as the dormitory vending is now included in the permit. A renovation to add storage at the I-40 Duplin County Rest Area was begun. Preliminary work was also done to get the potential new facilities located in the Goldsboro and Rocky Mount areas up and running.

The contract for the vending operation at Goodwill Industries, Charlotte was cancelled leaving 84 facilities at the end of the quarter. Two operators entered the program and two operators left the program for a total of 80 operators at the beginning and end of the quarter.

There were vacancies at the Caswell Building, Raleigh, the Compound Café, Fort Bragg, the Mecklenburg County DSS and the Caswell Center, Kinston.

Vending Machine repairs for this quarter totaled $17,644.


BUSINESS ENTERPRISES PROGRAM

Annual Board Report

Fiscal Year 2003 – July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003

Gross sales from all foodservice facilities amounted to $11,525,430 during fiscal year 2003; for fiscal year 2002 total sales were $11,967,238. The gross profit percentage for this year was 50.2% compared to 49.1% for last year.

Net proceeds paid to operators totaled $2,907,543 during this period compared to $2,922,553 paid during FY 2002. Average operator income for FY 03 was $35,681.59 as compared to $36,043 for the same period last year.

The following facilities were renovated to various degrees: Winston-Salem Federal Building, I-77 Iredell/Yadkin Rest Area, I-85 Alamance Rest Area, I-40 Duplin County Rest Area, Forsyth County Courthouse, Caswell Building (Raleigh), Kendall Complex (Raleigh), Hal Marshall Center (Charlotte), Buncombe County Courthouse, Asheville City Hall and the New Hanover County Courthouse.

The Spruce Pines/ Mountain View facility was opened and permits were expanded to include all vending at the USPS General Mail facility in Charlotte and the USPS Bulk Mail facility in Greensboro. In addition the dormitory vending was also added to the permit for the SJAFB Federal Prison Camp in Goldsboro.

For the year the Buncombe County Courthouse and Asheville City Hall facilities were combined, one new facility was opened and one facility was closed. There were a total of 84 facilities at the end of this fiscal year.

Eight Operators entered the program and ten Operators left the program for a total of 80 Operators at the end of the fiscal year and a total of 90 Operators served throughout the year.

There were vacancies at the following facilities: Caswell Buiding (Raleigh), ITS (Raleigh), Controllers Office (Raleigh), Compound Café (Fort Bragg), Industries for the Blind (Winston-Salem), Gaston County Courthouse, Polk Building (Charlotte), USPS – Hickory, Mecklenburg County DSS and the Caswell Center (Kinston).

Vending Machine repairs totaled $56,259 for the year.


INDEPENDENT LIVING SERVICES PROGRAM

FOURTH QUARTER 2002/2003

APRIL, MAY, JUNE 2003

During the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2002-2003, the Independent Living Services Program served 4,257 people and they received one or more of the following services: Adjustment Services for the Blind, Health Support Services, Family Adjustment Services, Employment and Training, Housing and Home Improvement.

Chore Services for the Blind were provided for 407 people and enabled them to continue living in their homes and/or communities.

Information and Referral Services were available in all 100 counties.

Orientation and Mobility Services were provided for 483 individuals.

Special Assistance for the Blind was provided each month for an average of 113 people who reside in domiciliary care facilities. The average monthly payment for rest home clients was $592.


INDEPENDENT LIVING SERVICES PROGRAM

ANNUAL REPORT

FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2002-JUNE 30, 2003

During the 2002-2003 fiscal year, the Independent Living Services Program served 5,916 people and they received one or more of the following services: Adjustment Services for the Blind, Health Support Services, Family Adjustment Services, Employment and Training, Housing and Home Improvement.

Chore Services for the Blind were provided for 483 people and enabled them to continue living in their homes and/or communities.

1,050 clients received specialized Orientation and Mobility Services and were able to travel about more safely and with greater independence.

Special Assistance for the Blind was provided each month for an average of 118 people who reside in domiciliary care facilities. The average monthly payment for rest home clients was $594.


MEDICAL EYE CARE PROGRAM

SFY 2002/2003

The following information regarding services is posted by quarter followed by annual total.

Eye Examinations, 1,184; 1,195; 1,186; 1,387; Annual, 4,952

Surgery Treatment, 691; 743; 726; 863; Annual, 3,023

Pharmacy, 243; 252; 253; 260; Annual, 1,008

Corrective Lenses, 463; 391; 389; 535; Annual, 1,778

Children Screening, 4,032; 2,646; 1,606; 524; Annual, 8,808

Referred, 149; 667; 70; 4; Annual, 890

Glaucoma Screening, 1,240; 2,823; 2,178; 2,210; Annual, 8,451

Referred, 84; 104; 131; 87 Annual, 406

Number of Mini Centers Held, 13, 12, 17; 11; Annual, 53

Number Attending Mini Centers, 77; 59; 92; 115; Annual, 343

Group Trainings Held, 8; 21; 8; 18; Annual, 55

Number Attending, 77; 59; 71; 86; Annual, 293

Public Awareness Events, 15; 9; 23; 22; Annual, 69

Diabetic Education, number served, 91; 146; 128; 181; Annual, 546

Number of Group Sessions, 57; 43; 20; 123; Annual, 243

Number of Low Vision Evaluations; 666; 618; 666; 771; Annual, 2,721

Follow Up Training, 73; 53; 98; 96; Annual, 320

CCTV Evaluations, 42; 53; 43; 42; Annual, 180

 


MEDICAL EYE CARE PROGRAM

APRIL, MAY, JUNE 2003

FOURTH QUARTER 2002/2003

The primary focus for the Medical Eye Care Program is the prevention of blindness and restoration of sight. A total of 4,121 people received services which addressed this goal during the third quarter of 2002/2003. This total includes 1,387 eye examinations, 2,210 people screened for glaucoma, and 524 children screened for amblyopia and other vision defects. These screenings resulted in 87 adults being referred to eye doctors as glaucoma suspects with 4 children being referred to eye doctors for follow up. With regard to restoration of vision, 535 pair of eyeglasses were purchased. The Division sponsored 863 treatment/surgeries which prevented blindness and in many cases restored sight.

The 9 Nursing Eye Care Consultants also provided low vision assessments for 771 people.


MEDICAL EYE CARE PROGRAM

JULY 1, 2002-JUNE 30, 2003

ANNUAL REPORT

The primary focus for the Medical Eye Care Program is the prevention of blindness and restoration of sight. A total of 22,211 people received services which addressed this goal during the 2002/2003 SFY. This total includes 4,952 eye examinations, 8,451 people screened for glaucoma, and 8,808 children screened for amblyopia and other vision defects. These screenings resulted in 406 adults being referred to eye doctors as glaucoma suspects and 890 children referred to eye doctors for follow up. With regard to restoration of vision, 1,778 pair of eyeglasses were purchased. The Division sponsored 3,023 treatment/surgeries which prevented blindness and in many cases restored sight.

The 9 Nursing Eye Care Consultants also provided low vision assessments for 2,721 people.

The following information regarding morbidity is posted by quarter followed by year to date totals.

SFY 2002/2003

Diagnosis:

1. Amblyopia, 11, 9, 7, 10; Annual, 37

2. Aniridia, 0, 0, 0, 1; Annual, 1

3. Anophthalmus/Enuclueation, 1, 6, 9, 4; Annual, 20

4. Aphakia, 32, 42, 33, 24; Annual, 131

5. Arthritis, 0, 0. 0, 0; Annual, 0

6. Blepharitis/Conjunctivitis, 4, 5, 14, 19; Annual, 42

7. Cataract, 272, 245, 305, 281; Annual, 1,103

8. Chalazion, 2, 5, 1, 6; Annual, 14

9. Choroid Disease, 0, 5, 9, 3; Annual, 17

10. Coloboma, 1, 4, 0, 3; Annual, 8

11. Detached Retina, 20, 35, 21. 42; Annual, 118

12. Diabetic Retinopathy, 125, 190, 236, 197; Annual, 748

13. Ectropion/Entropion/Ptosis, 0, 0, 5, 8; Annual, 13

14. Exophthalmos, 1, 1, 5, 1; Annual, 8

15. Glaucoma, 257, 265, 377, 293; Annual, 1,192

16. Hypertensive Retinopathy, 0, 0, 8, 3; Annual, 11

17. Iritis, 4, 2, 21, 3; Annual, 30

18. Keratitus, 6, 15, 22, 19; Annual, 62

19. Keratoconus, 4, 6, 12, 19; Annual, 41

20. Lacrimal Disease, 2, 0, 5, 3; Annual, 10

21. Macular Degeneration, 19, 15, 37, 3; Annual, 74

22. Microphthalmus, 0, 0, 0, 0; Annual, 0

23. Neuritis, 1, 0, 0, 4; Annual, 5

24. Nystagmus, 5, 6, 6, 1; Annual, 18

25. Optic Atrophy, 4, 11, 18, 22; Annual, 55

26. Other Muscle Disorders, 0, 6, 4, 2; Annual, 12

27. Other Retinopathy, 3, 14, 10, 10; Annual, 37

28. Papilledema/Papillitis, 0, 0, 0, 0; Annual, 0

29. Phthisis, 1, 0, 0, 0; Annual, 1

30. Pterygium, 5, 7, 5, 13; Annual, 30

31. Retinitis Pigmentosa, 3, 6, 4, 7; Annual, 20

32. Retinopathy of Prematurity, 0, 2, 2, 4; Annual, 8

33. Sclera Disease, 12, 7, 6, 10; Annual, 35

34. Strabismus, 8, 7, 6, 1; Annual, 22

35. Subluxed Lens, 3, 0, 0, 3; Annual, 6

36. Vitreous Disease, 21, 52, 37, 39; Annual, 149

EVALUATION UNIT

Number of Persons Receiving Low Vision Exams, 22, 30, 34, 26; Annual, 112

Number of Low Vision Aids Dispensed, 8, 31, 27, 32; Annual, 98


COMMISSION REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND

April 1, 2003 – June 30, 2003

REHABILITATION SERVICES

The accomplishments of the Rehabilitation Program of the Division of Services for the Blind during the April – June 2003 quarter are as follows:

Clients served, current quarter, 2,588; same quarter last year, 2,447; year to date, 3,451.

Severely disabled, 2,354; same quarter last year, 2,181; year to date, 3,115.

Clients rehabilitated, 294; same quarter last year, 181; year to date, 673.

Severely disabled, 272; same quarter last year, 162; year to date, 622.

Wage earners, 277; same quarter last year, 166; year to date, 640.

Non-Wage earners, 17; same quarter last year, 15; year to date, 33.

Average Earnings of Persons Rehabilitated as Wage Earners, week before acceptance for services, $163.57; same quarter last year, $143.77, year to date, $157.63.

Average Earning of Persons Rehabilitated as Wage Earners week before closure, $306.64; same quarter last year, $300.91; year to date, $302.83.

Seventy (70) consumers received services at the Rehabilitation Center for the Blind during the quarter. Forty-two (42) of these individuals were served in the Regular Personal and Social Adjustment Program, four (4) were served in the Summer Transition/College Bound Program, none (0) received training in the Business Enterprise Program, and twenty-four (24) received training in computer/word processing Technology.

The Division of Services for the Blind Evaluation Unit provided comprehensive evaluation services for twenty-eight (28) persons during the quarter. They were evaluated in the following areas: medical, ophthalmological, psychological, educational, and vocational. The purpose of this evaluation process is to assess the abilities and limitations of each individual so that the individual and the counselor can jointly work together in the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment leading to suitable and satisfactory employment. Eighteen (18) individuals who received services at the Evaluation Unit were rehabilitated during the quarter.

Our Rehabilitation Program continues to emphasize the mandate as set forth in the 1973 Rehabilitation Act As Amended to serve the most severely handicapped individuals first, so that they may prepare for and engage in gainful employment or productive activity.


THE DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND

ANNUAL REPORT

FISCAL YEAR 2002-2003

REHABILITATION SERVICES

The accomplishments of the Rehabilitation Program of the Division of Services for the Blind during the 2002 - 2003 Fiscal year are as follows:

Clients served 3,451; year ending 2002 – 3,437.

Severely disabled 3,115; year ending 2002 –3,020.

Clients rehabilitated 673; year ending 2002 – 679.

Severely disabled 622; year ending 2002 – 614.

Wage earners 640; year ending 2002 – 624.

Non-Wage earners 33; year ending 2002 – 55.

Average Earnings of Persons Rehabilitated as Wage Earners, week before acceptance for services $157.63; year ending 2002 - $127.83.

Average Earning of Persons Rehabilitated as Wage Earners week before closure $302.83; year ending 2002 - $305.50.

Average Cost of Case Services of Persons Rehabilitated (does not include administrative costs) $3,979.40; year ending 2002 - $3,662.30.

One hundred and eighty (180) consumers received services at the Rehabilitation Center for the Blind during the year 2003. Ninety (90) of these individuals were served in the Regular Personal and Social Adjustment Program, twenty-seven (27) were served in the Summer Transition/College Bound Program, five (5) received training in the Business Enterprise Program, and fifty-eight (58) received training in computer/word processing Technology.

The Division of Services for the Blind Evaluation Unit provided comprehensive evaluation services for one hundred and two (102) persons during the year 2003. They were evaluated in the following areas: medical, ophthalmological, psychological, educational, and vocational. The purpose of this evaluation process is to assess the abilities and limitations of each individual so that the individual and the counselor can jointly work together in the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment leading to suitable and satisfactory employment. Forty-four (44) individuals who received services at the Evaluation Unit were rehabilitated during the year 2003.

 

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