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The July 2006 newsletter, print version

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Past Issues

   

The July 2006 issue, online version.

   


Refugee Day Celebration brings the World to Raleigh:

youths of Montagnard and Hmon danceUnable to return to their home countries, more than 1,000 refugees settle in North Carolina each year. An event in downtown Raleigh on June 20 celebrated the state's involuntary arrivals and the enrichment of their adopted home.


Dr. Devlin announces leadership changes in the Division of Public Health

Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force dedicates new Automated External Defibrillator in N.C. Legislative Building

¡Salud y Saludos!

DHHS has new Transportation Coordinator

   


New and Improved: DHHS has a new website address!
www.ncdhhs.gov

   


Forensic Tests for Alcohol to oversee training for sobriety testing across N.C.

One-day conference to address the challenge of diabetes

 


DHHS Wellness at Work

N.C. Disability Determination contributes to "Cool for Wake"

Adoption profile

   

 

 

   

Refugee Day Celebration Brings the World to Raleigh

Unable to return to their home countries, more than 1,000 refugees settle in North Carolina each year. An event in downtown Raleigh on June 20 celebrated the state’s involuntary arrivals and the enrichment of their adopted home.

Youths join in a danceThe World Refugee Day Celebration at the N.C. Museum of History combined seriousness with spectacle. Speeches and a round-table discussion provided insight into the daily struggles refugees face. Dance, costumes, music and art depicted the cultures that refugees bring to their new land — and that they were forced to leave behind.

The daylong event was part of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) declaration of June 20 as World Refugee Day. War, ethnic cleansing and political persecution drive millions of people worldwide from their homes each year. The UNCHR estimates the current worldwide refugee population at 9 million. The United States allows up to 70,000 refugees to resettle each year, although tightened immigration restrictions limited the total in 2004 to just over 32,000.

Refugees from Vietnam, Laos and Congo lead the Pledge of AllegianceNorth Carolina absorbs increasingly more refugees, said Marlene Myers, coordinator of the N.C. State Refugee Office, a part of the state Division of Social Services. Two years ago, 1,400 refugees from 37 nations made North Carolina their new home. Just since October, 818 refugees from 32 countries have settled in the state.

The conditions and homelands they fled range from civil war (Liberia) to genocide (Sudan) to ruthless political systems (Cuba and Myanmar, formerly known as Burma). Many of North Carolina’s refugee population were American allies during the Vietnam War (the Hmong of Laos and the Montagnards of Vietnam).

Mecklenburg and Guilford counties took in the most refugees last year, 348 and 319, respectively, followed by Wake (122) and Buncombe (118).

Montagnards perform traditional music

Most refugees pursue naturalized U.S. citizenship, Myers said. More than 1,000 refugees in North Carolina took English-language classes last year. Those courses, as well as short-term cash assistance, health screenings and help finding a job and housing, are funded by federal money and by private organizations, many of them faith-based.Montagnard traditional dance

 


 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

Last Modified: February 4, 2013