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North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services

   

Glossary of Terms


A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M
N   O    P    Q    R    S    T    U   V    W    X    Y    Z


A

ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (ADL)
A term used to describe basic self-care tasks that are a part of most people's regular day, such as bathing, dressing, grooming, moving around the house, and eating. ADLs are widely used to assess individual functioning status.

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ADULT CARE HOME COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Members are community citizens who are appointed by the local board of county commissioners to work to maintain the spirit of the Residents' Bill of Rights as well as promote community education and awareness of the operation of adult care homes in that county and the needs of the persons residing in these homes.

ADULT CARE HOMES
An assisted living residence in which the housing management provides 24-hour scheduled and unscheduled personal care services to two or more residents, either directly or, for scheduled needs, through formal written agreement with licensed home care or hospice agencies. Some licensed adult care homes provide supervision to persons with cognitive impairments whose decisions, if made independently, may jeopardize the safety or well-being of themselves or others and therefore require supervision. Medication in an adult care home may be administered by designated, trained staff. Adult care homes that provide care to two to six unrelated residents are commonly called family care homes. Adult care homes and family care homes are subject to licensure by the Division of Health Service Regulation.

ADULT DAY CARE
The provision of group care and supervision of adults (who may be physically or mentally disabled) in a place other than their usual residence on a less than 24 hour basis. Services are designed to support the adult's personal independence, as well as their physical, social, and emotional well-being. Adult day care programs are subject to certification by the Division of Aging and Adult Services.

ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE
A community-based day care program that provides health, social and recreational care, along with rehabilitative services. Staffing is by trained professionals and paraprofessionals and is under the supervision of a registered nurse. The program is ideal for the elderly or physically impaired adult who needs assistance in a protective setting during the day. Adult day health programs are subject to certification by the Division of Aging and Adult Services.

ADULT HOME SPECIALIST
The person(s) in the county department of social services given primary responsibility for assessing the need for adult care homes in the county, responding to all inquires regarding licensure, and monitoring homes for compliance with licensure rules.

ADULT PLACEMENT SERVICES
Adult Placement Services help aging or disabled adults find appropriate living and healthcare arrangements when their health, safety, and well-being can no longer be maintained at home. Placement arrangements are made in adult care homes, nursing homes, other substitute homes, residential health care settings, or institutions. Adults and their families receive help to complete medical evaluations and financial applications, and locate and move to new settings. They also may receive counseling to help them adjust to the change.

Adult placement services also help elderly and disabled adults in the following situations:
  • Those unable to maintain themselves in their own homes independently or with available community or family supports.
  • Those living in substitute homes, residential health care facilities, or institutions and need assistance in relocating due to changes in level of care needed.
  • Those who need assistance in returning to more independent living arrangements.
  • Those who need assistance in adjusting to or maintaining their placements due to individual or family problems or a lack of resources.
All 100 county departments of social services provide Adult Placement Services.

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking, and behavior.

AMERICANS with DISABILITY ACT (ADA)
Federal law which provides comprehensive civil rights protections for persons with disabilities. The Act defines disability as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

AREA AGENCY ON AGING
Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) plan, coordinate, and advocate for the development of a comprehensive service delivery system to meet the needs of older people in a specific geographic area. The AAA's provide training and technical support to county agencies that offer services to older adults.

ASSESSMENT
Activities performed by at least one professional (preferably a social worker and/or a nurse) to determine a person's current functional abilities and resources in six areas: physical health, mental health, social support, activities of daily living, environmental conditions, and financial situation. Assessment includes a home visit by a professional. Once the assessment is completed, activities related to developing and implementing a client service plan becomes part of case management.

ASSISTED LIVING
"Assisted living residence" means any group housing and services program for two or more unrelated adults, by whatever name it is called, that makes available, at a minimum, one meal a day and housekeeping services and provides personal care services directly or through a formal written agreement with one or more licensed home care or hospice agencies. The Department may allow nursing service exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Settings in which services are delivered may include self-contained apartment units or single or shared room units with private or area baths. Assisted living residences are to be distinguished from nursing homes subject to provisions of G.S. 131E-102.

ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES (ALDs)
Devices that increase loudness of specific sounds by bringing sound directly into the hearing aid or ear. ALDs solve three problems: minimizing background noise, reducing the effect of distance between hard of hearing people and the sound source and overriding poor acoustics.
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
Any technology or device which enables an individual to be more independent and/or enables an individual to accomplish a task. Examples of assistive technology includes motorized wheelchairs, TTY communicators, print readers, computers, voice-activated devices, etc.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING
The Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DSDHH) can provide consultation and training on the use of assistive listening devices and other assistive technology for the deaf and hard of hearing. Through their Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program (TEDP), low income residents with hearing loss may be eligible to receive free telecommunications equipment.

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B

BLINDNESS
Only two services provided by the Division of Services for the Blind have eligibility criteria requiring that a consumer be legally blind. They are In-Home Level I and Special Assistance for the Blind. However, DSB provides many other services that only require the consumer to be severely visually impaired and eligibility determination is made based on the consumer's eye report. Contact should be made with the Social Worker for the Blind in the local Department of Social Services for a determination of eligibility for Independent Living Services as well as referral to various other service programs in the agency.

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C

CAPTIONING
A process of translating the audio portion of video programming into text that appears at top or bottom of screen. Open captioning is similar to subtitles-available for all to read onscreen; closed captioning requires a decoder device or chip in order to make the captions visible onscreen. Required of television manufacturers by federal law since July of 1994, closed captioning is most frequently used in TV programming. Other uses include videotapes, advertisements, video paging systems, etc. For more information about obtaining captioning services, contact the National Captioning Institute (NCI) at 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 3000, Vienna, VA, 22182, (703) 91707600 (V/TTY).

CARE-LINE
The information and referral service of the NC Department of Health and Human Services.

CARE MANAGEMENT or CASE MANAGEMENT
This service provides professional assistance (typically registered nurses and/or social workers) to older adults and their families by identifying, accessing, and coordinating services that are necessary to enable the older adult to remain in the least restructured environment.

CERTIFICATE OF NEED (CON)
A competitive application process managed by the Division of Health Service Regulation by which providers acquire new institutional health care services (i.e., nursing home beds, hospital beds, rehabilitative beds, home health agencies and hospices, etc.) in accordance with the State Medical Facilities Plan. This serves as a quality assurance process for the state to manage quantity and costs of medical services.

CHORE SERVICES
See In-Home Aide Services

COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
A term that refers to damage or loss of intellectual or mental functioning. The act or process of "knowing", including awareness or judgment, is impaired. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of cognitive impairment among older adults.

COMBINATION FACILITY
A facility licensed under G.S. 131E-102 providing intermediate care and/or skilled nursing care and adult home care.

COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVES PROGRAM (CAP)
A Medicaid waiver program that provides community-based services to disabled adults, mentally retarded adults, children, and persons with AIDS who meet the medical requirements for nursing home level care. CAP services may include traditional Medicaid home health services (nursing, physical therapy, home health aide, etc.), as well as services not generally available under Medicaid (home delivered meals, respite care, in-home aide services, etc.).

CONGREGATE LIVING
A living arrangement in which two or more unrelated individuals reside in a house or apartment.

CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY (CCRC )
A facility that offers a continuum of care-from independent living, assisted-living, or rest home care, to nursing home care. Individuals are offered an independent living lifestyle with the security of knowing supportive and health care services are available if needed.

COST SHARING
The concept of soliciting a portion of the cost of a service provided from the service recipient.

COUNCIL ON AGING (COA)
A private, nonprofit organization or public agency that serves as a county focal point on aging and traditionally provides supportive services to older adults (located in some, but not all counties). Sometimes they serve as advisory boards to the county board of commissioners. Department on Aging is the term typically used when it is a public agency.

COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES (DSS)
A public agency that provides a range of services and public assistance to older and disabled adults, as well as children. County DSS's are located in all 100 counties in North Carolina. Services potentially available to adults include: Adult Protective Services, Guardianship, Foster Care Services and Placement, In-Home Aide Services, Transportation, At-Risk Case Management, Individual & Family Adjustment, and Adult Care Home Case Management. DSS's are also responsible for the primary consultation involved in monitoring of adult care homes and adult day care/day health programs.

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D

DEAF-BLIND
The inability to understand conversation with optimum amplification. Visual acuity usually does not exceed 20/200 in the better eye with corrective lens. Visual acuity is greater than 20/200 if the visual field is constricted to 20 degrees or less or a progressive condition that will lead to significant hearing and vision loss. A deaf-blind individual may prefer a qualified tactile or up-close interpreter.


DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY
North Carolina General Statute 122C-3(12a) defines a developmental disability as "a severe, chronic disability of a person which: is attributable to a mental or physical impairment or combination of mental and physical impairments; is manifested before the person attains age 22, unless the disability is caused by traumatic head injury and is manifested after age 22; is likely to continue indefinitely; results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following area of major life activity [self-care, receptive understanding) and expressive language learning, mobility (ability to move), self-direction (motivation), the capacity for independent living, and economic self-sufficiency]; reflects the person's need for a combination or sequence of special interdisciplinary services which are of a lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated; or when applied to children from birth through four years of age, may be evidenced as a developmental delay."

DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
Equipment (often prescribed by a doctor) to serve a medical purpose. Example: wheelchairs, bedside commodes, and hospital beds. Insurance considers payment on rental or purchase of this equipment.

F

FAMILY CAREGIVER SUPPORT PROGRAM (FCSP)
The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2000 established the National Family Caregiver Support Program to assist the aging network to develop a multi-faceted system of supports for caregivers. The Division of Aging and Adult Services and Area Agencies on Aging are administering the program in North Carolina.

FAMILY CARE HOME
"Family care home" means an adult care home having two to six residents. The structure of a family care home may be no more than two stories high and none of the aged or physically disabled persons being served there may be housed in the upper story without provision for two direct exterior ground-level accesses to the upper story. It is licensed by the Division of Health Service Regulation.

FL-2
Long-Term Services prior approval form which gives a summary of the patient's medical requirements and which reflect the attending physician's recommendation for the level of care needed in an institutional setting. An approved FL-2 is required for any Medicaid recipient in a skilled nursing facility (SNF)or an intermediate care facility (ICF). An FL-2 must also be completed by the attending physician prior to admission to an adult care home and at least annually thereafter.

FOOD STAMPS
A federal program that provides a monthly allotment of Food Stamp benefits issued via Electronic Benefit Transfer cards (ATM cards). The Food Stamp Program is an entitlement program, so all eligible individuals and households can receive assistance. Food Stamp benefits may be used to purchase most foods at participating stores. They may not be used to purchase tobacco, pet food, paper products, soap products, or alcoholic beverages. Administrative costs are 50% federal and 50% county. The stamps are 100% federal.

FOSTER CARE SERVICES FOR ADULTS
A service than involves recruiting, developing, and evaluating adult care homes to determine if they meet the needs of residents and to help them improve upon their service. All county DSS's that have an adult care home in their county provide this service.

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G

GROUP HOME FOR DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED ADULTS
Provides care for 2 to 9 people. These are small residences, usually located in a regular neighborhood. Only adults who are developmentally disabled can live in these homes. They must be able to participate in community activities (ADAP, Sheltered Workshop jobs), be ambulatory, and either have or be able to develop self-help skills. The care provided includes room and board, personal assistance, supervision, and training with goal planning to help people develop self-help skills.
GUARDIANSHIP
The legal authority and duty given by the court to a person (guardian) for the purpose of assuming responsibility for the care and maintenance of another person (ward), who has been determined incapable of handling his/her own personal affairs. The powers and authority conferred upon a guardian depend on what type of guardianship is granted by the court.
  • Guardian of the Estate - Is responsible for collecting, preserving, and administering the property and income of the ward.
  • Guardian of the Person - Is entitled to custody of the ward and is responsible for the ward's care, comfort and maintenance. The guardian makes decisions such as where the ward will live, gives consent for medical or professional treatment of for the ward. The Guardian of the Person is responsible for the basic physical care of the ward and his/her immediate personal effects.
  • General Guardian - Performs the duties of both the Guardian of the Estate and Guardian of the Person.

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H

HARD OF HEARING
A hearing loss, which interferes with but does not totally preclude auditory and vocal communication. Hearing aids and other amplification or assistive listening devices often significantly assist these individuals.
HOME AND COMMUNITY CARE BLOCK GRANT (HCCBG)
Federal and state funds administered by the North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services and Adult Services (DOA). The Division receives funds from the Older Americans Act (OAA), Social Services Block Grant (SSBG), and the State General Assembly.

HOME-DELIVERED MEALS
A nutrition program that utilizes volunteers to deliver at least one hot nutritious meal per day (usually 5 days a week) to homebound adults. The meal offers one-third of the Recommended Daily Dietary Allowance.

HOME HEALTH SERVICES
Health care prescribed by a physician and given in the home to a person in need of medical care. Services may include skilled nursing services, therapy services (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy), medical social services, health promotion services, and home health aide services.

HOMEMAKER SERVICES
See In-home Aide Services

HOSPICE CARE
A service provided for terminally ill patients and their families. A hospice agency provides medical, nursing, and supportive services to meet the needs of families and patients in the last six months of the patient's life.

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I

ICF-MR
Intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded.

IN-HOME AIDE SERVICES
The in-home aide services previously known as Chore, Homemaker, Homemaker-Home Health Aide, Respite, and Personal Care Services have been incorporated into a single service entitled, "In-Home Aide Services". These are paraprofessional services that assist children and adults, their families, or both, with essential home management tasks, personal care tasks, supervision, or all of the above. Their purpose is to allow these individuals to function effectively in their own homes and the community for as long as possible. The four levels of care are:
  • HOME MANAGEMENT
    Level I: In-Home Aide Services at this level are intended to provide support to those needing assistance with basic home management tasks, such as housekeeping, cooking, shopping, and bill paying. Personal care tasks may not be performed at this level.
  • PERSONAL CARE
    Level II: In-Home Aide Services at this level are intended to provide support to persons/families who predominately require assistance with basic personal care (bathing, shaving, toileting, and personal hygiene), and associated home management tasks.
  • HOME MANAGEMENT
    Level III: In-Home Aide Services at this level are intended to provide intensive education and support to persons/families in carrying out home management tasks and improving family functioning skills.
  • PERSONAL CARE
    Level III: In-Home Aide Services at this level are intended to provide substantial activities of daily living (ADL) support to individuals/families who require assistance with health and personal care tasks. Provision of these tasks involves extensive "hands-on" care and potential assistance with a wide range of health related conditions.
  • HOME MANAGEMENT
    Level IV: In-Home Aide Services at this level are intended to provide a wide range of educational and supportive services to persons/families who are in crisis or who require long term assistance with complex home management tasks and family functioning skills. Provision of the service involves quick and creative response to individual/family crisis situations identified by the case manager. It also may focus on conducting appropriate learning sessions with small groups of persons from different families who have similar needs.
The Division of Aging and Adult Services has information about this service.

INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE (I & A)
The provision of I & A for older persons and their families is designed to: assess and evaluate an individual's needs; inform and educate about programs and services available across the long-term care continuum; refer and/or directly connect the individual to appropriate resources; provide assistance to negotiate the service delivery system; work with long distance caregivers in identifying and locating needed services; and advocate on behalf on individuals or a group to obtain change in the delivery or availability of services. Also see CARE-LINE

INSTRUMENTAL ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (IADL)
Basic tasks that are essential to living independently, such as cooking meals, housekeeping, laundry, paying bills, shopping, and using the telephone.

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL CARE
A level of care in a nursing facility that provides 24-hour assistance, with a minimum of eight hours of coverage daily by a licensed nurse, but no requirement for 24-hour skilled nursing services. Medicaid pays for skilled and intermediate care. Medicare pays only for skilled care.

INTERPRETERS
Professionals who are trained to facilitate communication between deaf/hard of hearing people and others not familiar with sign language or alternative communication methods. Interpreters are employed in a variety of situations, including one-on-one and group interactions. Because there are several types of interpreters, one must check with participants regarding the best choice(s) for given situation(s):
  • American Sign Language (ASL): a manual language with its own vocabulary, syntax and grammar, distinct from spoken languages (e.g., English) and from sign languages in other countries.
  • Manually Coded English (MCE), formerly known as Pidgin Signed English (PSE), and Signed Exact English (SEE): different "hybrid" methods of using sign language communication, which combines elements of ASL and spoken (English) language.
  • Oral/Aural: Usually work with deaf/hard of hearing individuals who rely primarily or solely on speechreading. These interpreters choose words, phrases, and enunciations that are more easily visible on the lips.
  • Tactile: provide services to people who are visually impaired as well as deaf or hard of hearing. Typically, these interpreters work one-on-one, because the signing is done directly in or on the hands of the consumer.
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L

LATE DEAFENED
Individuals who have lost their hearing post-lingually (after spoken language development) and who often require the use of assistive listening devices and visually-oriented communication strategies (e.g., CART, written materials). Onset of this type of hearing loss can be sudden or gradual.
LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE
A type of insurance designed to pay some or all of the costs of nursing home, community, or home health care. The Seniors' Health Insurance Information Program provides useful information on this form of insurance.
LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN
A professional who serves as an advocate for long-term care residents of nursing homes and adult care homes. Advocacy includes educating individuals about their rights and complex rules or regulations governing the long term care system. An Ombudsman can be requested to investigate concerns and serve as a mediator for conflict resolution should a resident encounter difficulty exercising rights.

Ombudsmen are available to:

  • Serve as a resource for anyone who has questions about long term care regulations;
  • Be involved in the care planning process or family meetings;
  • Provide training to staff, resident councils, or family councils;
  • Provide information and referral;
  • Provide state survey results on local facilities; and
  • Talk about any situation that may arise from being a resident, family member, or staff person of a facility.

The Long Term Care Ombudsman program is federally mandated through the Older Americans Act. There is at least one Ombudsman for each of the 17 aging regions in North Carolina. Each county also has local Community Advisory Committees. These are volunteers who are appointed by the county commissioners to serve as grass roots advocates for residents in the facilities.

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M

MEDICAID (TITLE XIX of the Social Security Act)
A Federal- and State-funded health care program for eligible persons. To be eligible a person must meet income and assets limits, and be aged, blind, disabled, a member of a family with dependent children, or a pregnant woman. Some people are covered by both Medicare and Medicaid. Administered by the Division of Medical Assistance in the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, the program provides medical care for qualifying recipients. Applications for Medicaid are made through the County Department of Social Services.

MEDICARE
A Federal health insurance program for persons aged 65 and over who are eligible for Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits and for some people who are disabled regardless of age. There are two parts: Part A is hospital insurance which is automatic, for those eligible, and Part B covers the physician and other services. Part B is voluntary and requires a monthly premium.

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NURSING HOME COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Members are community citizens who are appointed by the local board of county commissioners to work to maintain the spirit of the Residents' Bill of Rights as well as promote community education and awareness of the operation of nursing homes in that county and the needs of the persons residing in these homes. The Ombudsman Program supports the work of these advisory comittees.

NURSING HOMES
Skilled nursing and intermediate-care facilities.

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST (OT)
Occupational therapists assist in rehabilitation through the design and implementation of individualized programs to improve or restore functions impaired by illness or injury.

OLDER AMERICANS ACT (OAA)
Federal legislation established in 1965 providing broad policy objectives designed to meet the needs of older persons. The key philosophy of the program has been to help maintain and support older persons in their homes and communities and to avoid unnecessary or premature institutionalization.

OMBUDSMAN
A representative of a public agency or a nonprofit organization who investigates and resolves complaints made by or on the behalf of older individuals who are residents of long-term care facilities. In North Carolina the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman is located in the Division of Aging and Adult Services of the Department of Health and Human Services. There are Regional Ombudsmen across the state who are located within the Area Agency on Aging, a part of the regional council of government.

OUTREACH
Agency activities to increase the public awareness of services to older persons and to provide information on available services.

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P

PERSONAL CARE
See In-Home Aide Services

PERSONAL CARE SERVICES (PCS)
Paraprofessional care (comparable to In-Home Aide Services, Personal Care Levels II and III) covered by Medicaid for eligible persons.

PERSONAL EMERGENCY ALARM RESPONSE
A service that uses telephone lines to alert a central monitoring facility (often a hospital emergency room) of an emergency in the household. This service is predominantly used by older adults who live alone and are at risk of medical emergencies (Example: Life line).

POVERTY LEVEL
An income guideline established federally to define individuals who are economically disadvantaged. In North Carolina, it is also the income level that establishes eligibility for Medicaid.

PRIMARY ADJUSTMENT SERVICES
Services are provided to enable eligible blind or visually impaired individuals to attain and/or maintain the highest level of functioning possible, to promote their well-being, and to prevent or reduce dependency. This is achieved through a focused regimen of counseling and casework assistance to individuals and their families.

PROTECTIVE SERVICES FOR ADULTS
Disabled adults are vulnerable to abuse, neglect, and exploitation. County departments of social services receive and evaluate reports to determine whether disabled adults are in need of protective services and what services are needed (as required by Article 6, Chapter 108A of the North Carolina General Statutes). Disabled adults or disabled emancipated minors present in North Carolina who are reported to be abused, neglected, or exploited, and in need of protective services are eligible to receive this service without regard to income.

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QUALIFIED MEDICARE BENEFICIARY/MEDICARE-AID (QMB)
Assistance for those who do not qualify for Medicaid, but whose income is very low (pays Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles for A and B, etc).

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RETIREMENT COMMUNITY
A housing complex designed for older adults. Many of the retirement communities allow monthly rental, while others require purchase of the unit. Persons living in retirement communities are generally able to care for themselves; however, assistance from home care agencies is allowed by some communities. Activities and socialization are provided.

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S

Senior Care Program
This program is designed specifically to provide assistance to North Carolina seniors diagnosed with one of three diseases, who meet the income guidelines, and who are coping with the rising costs of prescription medicine. At this site, you may find out details concerning the program's benefits, information on eligibility, etc.
SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM
Provides a stipend to low income older adults to volunteer to provide in-home services to the elderly to help them live independently. Available in a limited number of counties in North Carolina.

SENIOR HEALTH INSURANCE INFORMATION PROGRAM (SHIIP)
Sponsored by the N. C. Insurance Commissioner's Office. Volunteers assist older adults with information about all types of insurance issues, including long-term care insurance.

SKILLED NURSING FACILITY (SNF)
A nursing home that provides 24 hour-a-day nursing services for a person who has serious health care needs but does not require the intense level of care provided in a hospital. Rehabilitation services may also be provided. Many of these facilities are federally certified, which means they may participate in Medicaid or Medicare programs.

SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT (SSBG)
Federal funds (Title XX of the Social Security Act, with state and county match) provide a variety of services for children and adults. Examples are Adult Protective Services (APS), Placement, Guardianship, In-Home Aide Services, and Transportation.

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE FOR ADULTS (S/CSA)
Special Assistance is program that provides an income supplement to assist low-income elderly and disabled adults pay for their cost of care (room and board) in an Adult Care Home. SA eligible facilities can include Family Care Homes, Group Homes for the Developmentally Disabled, Adult Care Homes, Group Homes for the Mentally Ill, Combination facilities, and some participating Hospice residential facilities. The two major recipient categories are Special Assistance for the Aged (SAA), for recipients 65 or older, and Special Assistance for the Disabled (SAD), for recipients between the ages of 18 and 64 who are determined disabled based on Social Security guidelines. Recipients in both categories must reside in a licensed adult care home facility and meet all other eligibility criteria. See the State/County Special Assistance for Adults Program Information Brochure for more information regarding this program. Special Assistance for Certain Disabled (SCD) is also available in some counties. These recipients are adults between 18 and 64 who are living in their own homes, are unemployable because of an impairment, but who have not been able to meet the Social Security disability requirements. The SA program is supervised by the Division of Social Services, Adult and Family Services Section, and administered by the 100 county departments of social services. Funding for SA is 50% state dollars and 50% county dollars with 100% of the administration costs being paid by the counties.

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE BLIND
Special Assistance for the Blind (SAB) is available in all 100 counties to persons who are legally blind and whose financial resources are not sufficient to meet his/her daily living demands (as defined by income guidelines of the program). SAB is a joint program of State and County agencies with the funding sources as 50% state and 50% county. There are two types of financial assistance available from Special Assistance for the Blind:
  1. Cash payments for eligible blind individuals residing in a rest home
  2. Cash payments provided for eligible blind individuals residing in private living arrangements.

An application can be obtained by contacting the Social Worker for the Blind in any County Department of Social Services or by contacting the SAB Eligibility Specialist in the State Office of the Division of Services for the Blind (919-733-9744). The application should then be completed and an eye report should be attached. If the applicant is a resident of a rest home (an adult care home) or a specialized community residential center or is planning to enter one of these facilities, a FL-2 Form (Level of Care Designation Form) which has been completed by a physician should be attached. The application is processed by the SAB Eligibility Specialist in the State Office of DSB and the applicant is notified by mail of the eligibility decision.

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME (SSI)
A federal program that pays monthly checks to people in need who are 65 years or older and to people in need at any age who are blind and disabled. The purpose of the program is to provide sufficient resources so that anyone who is 65, or blind, or disabled can have a basic monthly income. Eligibility is based on income and assets. SSI is administered nationally and locally by the Social Security Administration.

SUPPORT GROUPS
Usually made up of caregivers, family members, and friends of a person experiencing an illness such as Alzheimer's Disease, cancer, Parkinson's, etc. People are brought together by a common concern, situation, or experience. A professional usually facilitates group discussion and sharing of experiences and feelings. Educational programs are also common among support groups. Contact the Family Caregiver Resource Specialists at your Area Agency on Aging for information about support groups.

Support groups for severely visually impaired and blind persons have been organized in many counties. They vary in their organization as some are recreational while others are more therapeutic. Many persons benefit from these groups as it is helpful to know that one is not alone in dealing with severe vision loss. Contact should be made with the Social Worker for the Blind at the County Department of Social Services to determine if and when a support group meets in the county.

SUPPORT SERVICES PROVIDER (SSP)
Refers to individuals who assist people who are deaf-blind with a range of tasks such as, but not limited to, visual guide, driver (transportation) and tactile or up-close interpreter.

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T

TRANSPORTATION
There is some assistance with general transportation and transportation to medical services in some extent in every NC county .
TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN (TDP)
A required 5-year county plan for a coordinated system of transportation, submitted to NCDOT (North Carolina Department of Transportation) in order to receive federal funds.

TTY
Telecommunications device for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing (TDD): A device similar to a computer keyboard, either with a cradle to rest a telephone hand set on or connected directly to the telephone. A TDD allows the user to communicate by typing messages on the keyboard and receiving message on the screen about the keyboard. The teletext devise typewriter is usually referred to as a TTY by members of the deaf and hard of hearing community.

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VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
Supported by both Federal and State moneys, allocated for the specific purpose of vocational services. The services of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation include diagnostic procedures, surgery and treatment, prosthetic devices, hospital convalescent, training material, maintenance, occupational expenses, interpreter services, and transportation. The Independent Living Program also provides personal assistant services.

Vocational rehabilitation services are provided to persons who are severely visually impaired and blind by the Division of Services for the Blind (DSB). All services provided by this program are aimed toward employment. However, there are Independent Living Rehabilitation Counselors who serve people who do not plan to go to work but need to improve their independent living skills.

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Last updated April 26, 2013