North Carolina Radon Program

Finance Your Radon Mitigation System

https://fsastore.com/fsa-eligibility-list/r/radon-mitigation

If a medical professional recommends radon mitigation due to it causing a medical condition from being in a home, the cost of mitigation is eligible with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LMN) and eligible for reimbursement with a flexible spending account (FSA), health savings account (HSA) or a health reimbursement arrangement (HRA). Radon mitigation reimbursement is not eligible with a limited-purpose flexible spending account (LPFSA) or a dependent care flexible spending account (DCFSA).

NC Governor Roy Cooper Proclamation

Governor Roy Cooper proclaimed January 2024 as Radon Action Month to raise the public’s awareness of radon, promote testing and mitigation for radon, and reduce the risk of lung cancer from radon. Read the news release about ordering a free Rason test kit.

Want to know if you should test for radon?

A New Map is now available to help you determine if you should test for radon in air and/or your private well water.  Find your county map and guidance.

Radon Test Kits

The demand for free test kits was very high this year. All 5,000 free test kits have been claimed and sent.  We plan to hold another free test kit program in January 2025.

At this time, you may purchase a test kit at a discounted price from Air Chek. You may also find information about other test kits by clicking on "Testing for Radon" in the navigation bar to the right.

Watch a video on how to use the Air Chek test kit.

Following are written instructions on how to use the Air Chek radon test kit

* English

* Español

 

Presentation by Dr. Tomi Akinyemiju of the Duke Cancer Institute

Review the recorded presentation by NC Radon Coordinator Phillip Gibson and Dr. Tomi Akinyemiju of Duke Cancer Institute regarding Duke's latest research on climate change, radon, and impacts to marginalized communities of people. This event was organized by the NC Department of Health and Human Services Human Resources.

 

New Legislation

The North Carolina Radon Program is presently developing a Radon Proficiency Program as directed by Session Law 2023-91 House Bill 782. Please contact Catherine Rosfjord for additional information catherine.rosfjord@dhhs.nc.gov.

Duke Cancer Institute Presents Award

Health Equity Award from Duke Cancer Institute

Dr. Tomi Akinyemiju of Duke Cancer Institute presented this award to NC Radon Program Coordinator Phillip Gibson in honor of exceptional leadership in promoting community health equity. 

Message from the NC Academy of Family Physicians

The North Carolina Radon Program is a program of the NC Radiation Protection Section that works to reduce the incidence of radon-induced lung cancer statewide through education. 

The purpose of the North Carolina Radon Program is to:

  • Increase awareness of the source and health impacts of radon exposure
  • Provide resources that assist North Carolinians with testing indoor radon levels
  • Empower North Carolinians with information on how to lower radon levels

Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. An estimated 21,000 people nationally die each year from radon-induced lung cancer. 450 North Carolinians are estimated to die each year due to radon-induced lung cancer. 

Data provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention indicated that 77 of the100 counties in North Carolina have radon indoor air levels above action level of 4 pCi/L. 

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and chemically inert radioactive gas. It is formed by the natural radioactive decay of uranium in rock, soil and water. Testing for radon is the only way to know how much is present in a building. 

Reducing the incidence of radon-induced lung cancer is a priority issue of the NC Cancer Control Plan and the NC State Health Improvement Plan

CDC Radon by the Numbers

Frequently Asked Questions

Tab/Accordion Items

Testing recommendations and suggestions for each county are found by clicking on this link

Certified radon measurement professionals can be found by clicking on this link

Certified radon mitigation professionals can be found by clicking on this link

Radon is a gas, radioactive particles, that are drawn into your home through a number of pathways. Buildings are like vacuums, drawing gasses of all sorts inside. As radon is naturally made under your home, then the suction of the building draws radon inside.

No. Some North Carolina homes have radon mitigation systems that were installed in the 1990s. Radon mitigation fans are generally warrantied for 5 years. The recommendation is to test your home at most every five years, whether or not you have a radon mitigation system. This will help you determine if your system is keeping indoor radon levels low.

Yes. All home types should test for radon. This includes condos, town homes, homes with crawl spaces, homes on a slab, manufactured and modular homes, and apartments.

Probably not. At this time, the EPA does not believe sufficient data exists to conclude that the types of granite commonly used in countertops are significantly increasing indoor radon levels.

The following map shows the highest level of radon measured in each county. Data for this map was obtained from the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Public Health Tracking Network website.

  • Red shade: A county with at least one radon building test that measured at or above 4 picoCuries per Liter of air
  • Orange shade: A county with at least one radon building test that measured between 2 to 3.9 picoCuries per Liter of air
  • Grey shade: A county with at least one radon building test that measured at or below 1.9 picoCuries per Liter of air