Donate to Hurricane Recovery

Press Releases

NC Opioid Overdose Deaths Drop for First Time in 5 Years

Thursday, August 29, 2019 For the first time in five years the number of unintentional opioid-related overdose deaths among North Carolina residents has fallen. According to preliminary data collected by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, unintentional opioid-related overdose deaths decreased by 5 percent in 2018. In 2017, deaths increased 34 percent from the year before. 

NCDHHS Dedicates New Broughton Hospital Building

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services officials joined other state and local officials today to dedicate the new Broughton Hospital, one of the state's three  acute care psychiatric hospitals. "Today’s dedication marks the start of a new era of acute mental health care for residents of our 37 western counties," said DHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D. "From start to finish, the hospital was designed by and for the people it serves. It was built with the understanding that wellbeing is rooted in whole-person health care."

Governor Cooper Signs the Opioid Response Act and Other Bills Into Law

Monday, July 22, 2019 Today, Governor Roy Cooper signed the House Bill 325, the Opioid Epidemic Response Act, to help increase access to medication assisted treatment and expand harm reduction measures to reduce opioid overdose deaths across the state. Gov Cooper was joined by lawmakers from both parties and families affected by the substance abuse crisis. The bill garnered widespread support from the General Assembly led by Senator Jim Davis and Senator Gladys A. Robinson. The Opioid Epidemic Response Act will:

NC Receives $1.2 Million in Grants to Fight Opioid Epidemic in Six Rural Communities

Wednesday, July 3, 2019 Six rural North Carolina communities will share $1.2 million in federal grant funds to strengthen and expand their response to opioid use disorder with increased planning; prevention; evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment; and recovery service delivery.

The Walter B. Jones Center Celebrates 50 Years of Recovery, Expands Treatment Services

Friday, June 21, 2019

The Walter B. Jones Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Center on Wednesday celebrated 50 years of recovery services and the expansion of treatment services for residents of eastern North Carolina.

Governor Notes Progress in Fighting Opioid Epidemic; Unveils Opioid Action Plan 2.0

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Today, at the opening of the 2019 Opioid Summit, Governor Roy Cooper highlighted the state’s progress in addressing the opioid epidemic over the last two years and launched the updated Opioid Action Plan 2.0 to continue to combat this issue in North Carolina.

R.J. Blackley Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Center Now Certified to Initiate Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder

Friday, May 10, 2019

To boost North Carolina’s response to the opioid crisis, R.J. Blackley Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Center in Butner recently became certified as an opioid treatment program for people with opioid use disorder. 

Broughton Hospital to Host Job Fair; Staff Begins Move to New Building

Thursday, May 9, 2019 The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is seeking job applicants to work at the new Broughton Hospital in Morganton, following final acceptance of the new state psychiatric hospital by the State Construction Office. The hospital is scheduled to open for patient care in late September.

Mental Health Providers, Consumers, Advocates Urge Legislators to Close the Health Coverage Gap to Increase Access to Behavioral Treatment

Thursday, May 9, 2019 “The cost of doing nothing is not nothing,” John Owen, mental health consumer, told Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D, at a roundtable to discuss the impact of untreated behavioral health on communities and the challenges of accessing care for those who need it. He called on legislators to follow the lead of 37 other states and expand Medicaid.

Statement from Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D., about the tragic event at UNC-Charlotte

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

We know that events like this are stressful and there is no right or wrong way to feel. People can experience a wide range of emotions as anxiety manifests differently in everybody. Signs of distress can include: changes in sleep, appetite, energy or substance/medication use and physical manifestations such as headaches or stomach aches. The important thing to know is that there are resources to help people cope with the ramifications of traumatic events.